Iter Press Databases

Iter’s Bibliography, the largest and most comprehensive online discovery tool for medieval and early modern studies, is accompanied here by several specialized online bibliographies and research tools published or supported by Iter Press. The subscription-based bibliographies are followed by open access resources. For information about publication proposals, please write to [email protected]

Iter Bibliography

An Open URL- and Zotero-enabled bibliography comprised of secondary source material pertaining to the Middle Ages and Renaissance (400–1700). Citations for books and journal material (articles, reviews, review articles, bibliographies, catalogues, abstracts, and discographies) are included, as are citations for dissertation abstracts and essays in books (including entries in conference proceedings, festschriften, encyclopedias, and exhibition catalogues).

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Journal Title Count:
2,277, published 1784–.

Essay Collection Title Count:
16,657, published 1874–.

Record Count:

Articles697,325
Essays366,691
Reviews293,715
Monographs113,829
Dissertation abstracts *19,723
Review articles13,809
Abstracts13,098
Bibliographies12,411
Catalogues3,473
Discographies41
Total1,534,115

* For his dedicated and longstanding work to select many of the dissertation abstracts included in the Bibliography, Iter is indebted to the late Jonathon Erlen, retired History of Medicine Librarian and adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh. 

Resource Last Updated:
September 2023. More than 60,000 new records were added, spanning 1,212 journal titles (including 102 new titles) and 2,023 essay collections.


Iter Italicum

Brill and Iter are pleased to present the only online edition of Paul Oskar Kristeller’s Iter Italicum, the most comprehensive finding list available of previously uncatalogued or incompletely catalogued Renaissance humanistic manuscripts found in libraries and collections all over the world. Originally published in six volumes between 1963 and 1992, it is an essential tool for any scholar working in the fields of classical, medieval, and Renaissance studies.

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Paul Oskar Kristeller (1905–1999) received doctorates in the field of philosophy from the University of Heidelberg (1928) and the University of Pisa (1937). In addition, he held many honorary degrees. He taught in Florence, Pisa, Yale and finally, Columbia University where he rose from associate in philosophy to professor and in 1968 was appointed F. J. E. Woodbridge Professor. He became professor emeritus in 1973 but continued as a special lecturer until 1976. Columbia awarded him an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters in 1974. He published numerous books and articles on almost every aspect of Renaissance thought and remains one of the foremost historians of Renaissance thought and philosophy.

Record Count:
2,779

Subject Access:
Search or browse by keyword, country, city, library, and library collection.

Alternative Formats:

CD-ROM
Iter Italicum: Accedunt Alia Itinera. On CD-ROM. A Database of Uncatalogued or Incompletely Catalogued Humanistic Manuscripts of the Renaissance in Italian and other Libraries. Compiled by Paul Oskar Kristeller. Consultant Editor Luciano Floridi. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1995.

PRINT
Iter Italicum: a Finding List of Uncatalogued or Incompletely Catalogued Humanistic Manuscripts of the Renaissance in Italian and other Libraries. Volume 1: Italy: Agregento to Novara. Compiled by Paul Oskar Kristeller. London: The Warburg Institute; Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1963.

Iter Italicum: a Finding List of Uncatalogued or Incompletely Catalogued Humanistic Manuscripts of the Renaissance in Italian and other Libraries. Volume 2: Italy: Orvieto to Volterra [and] Vatican City. Compiled by Paul Oskar Kristeller. London: The Warburg Institute; Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1967.

Iter Italicum: Accedunt Alia Itinera: a Finding List of Uncatalogued or Incompletely Catalogued Humanistic Manuscripts of the Renaissance in Italian and other Libraries. Volume 3 (Alia Itinera I): Australia to Germany. Compiled by Paul Oskar Kristeller. London: The Warburg Institute; Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1967.

Iter Italicum: Accedunt Alia Itinera: a Finding List of Uncatalogued or Incompletely Catalogued Humanistic Manuscripts of the Renaissance in Italian and other Libraries. Volume 4 (Alia Itinera II): Great Britain to Spain. Compiled by Paul Oskar Kristeller. London: The Warburg Institute; Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1989.

Iter Italicum: Accedunt Alia Itinera: a Finding List of Uncatalogued or Incompletely Catalogued Humanistic Manuscripts of the Renaissance in Italian and other Libraries. Volume 5 (Alia Itinera III and Italy III): Sweden to Yugoslavia, Utopia [and] Supplement to Italy (A-F). Compiled by Paul Oskar Kristeller. London: The Warburg Institute; Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1990.

Iter Italicum: Accedunt Alia Itinera: a Finding List of Uncatalogued or Incompletely Catalogued Humanistic Manuscripts of the Renaissance in Italian and other Libraries. Volume 6 (Italy III and Alia Itinera IV): Supplement to Italy (G-V), Supplement to Vatican and Austria to Spain. Compiled by Paul Oskar Kristeller. London: The Warburg Institute; Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1992.


Milton: A Bibliography (1624-1799)

Compiled by John T. Shawcross, Milton: A Bibliography for the Years 1624-1700 (Revised) and for the Years 1701-1799 is an extensive revision and continuation of his Milton: A Bibliography for the Years 1624-1700 (1984). It is the only Milton bibliography that covers the eighteenth century.

The bibliography tries to bring together all manuscripts and editions of Milton’s works, all studies and critical statements concerning Milton’s life and works, all allusions and quotations, and all significant imitations, during the years 1624-1799.

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Users can browse by century or year, or perform Boolean, keyword or phrase searches. Cross references within the bibliography are linked, allowing for ease of navigation.

Shawcross’s work represents an invaluable resource for Milton scholars, and literary, history, and publication scholars of both the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Publisher:
Iter Press and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Series:
Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies Online

Record Count:
13,471


Bibliography of English Women Writers (1500-1640)

Compiled by Betty S. Travitsky, A Bibliography of English Women Writers 1500-1640 has evolved from an effort to compile a “comprehensive” record of often quaint past scholarship on some 180 known women writers into an open-ended work of scholarship currently listing 738 recovered writers and their texts, canonical and non-canonical. Including already familiar figures as well as less-known and hitherto unknown English women writers–refugees such as women recusants, women in the colonies, Marrano women (Anusot), women translators and English women writers in French, Greek, Latin, Spanish, Gaelic and Welsh–the bibliography functions not only as a listing of mushrooming scholarship, but also as a roster of English women writers, 1500-1640.

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While “comprehensiveness” remains the ideal goal of the bibliography, in the case of some particularly famous women, like Elizabeth Tudor and Mary Stuart, listings are limited to materials connected to these women’s writings, rather than their lives.

Preliminaries consist of bibliographies and catalogues, contextual studies (i.e., studies providing extended narrative or analysis), reference works (i.e., compendia of entries), anthologies of essays, special issues of journals, genre studies, handbooks and pedagogical tools, compilations containing primary sources, and dissertations. Individual listings, the bulk of the bibliography, begin with a main heading supplying the writer’s name and dates and contain lists of texts (along with English Short Title Catalogue numbers or locations of manuscripts), of editions, of compilations containing texts, and of both historical and analytical scholarship. Within these individual listings, added entries identify variants of names and of titles and notes provide further information essential to identifying the writers and texts.

Publisher:
Iter and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Series:
Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies Online

Record Count:
738


A Database of Dramatic Extracts

Edited by Laura Estill (St Francis Xavier University, Canada) and Beatrice Montedoro (University of Zurich, Switzerland), A Database of Dramatic Extracts (DEx) is an online, searchable database of extracts from English plays found in seventeenth-century manuscripts. DEx aims to provide much-needed information to textual editors, literary scholars, and cultural historians interested in theater history, audience reception, early modern print and manuscript culture, and the history of reading.

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Overview
Early modern readers and playgoers often kept commonplace books and miscellanies, where they would copy poems, aphorisms, letters, accounts, and any number of things—including selections from plays. DEx: A Database of Dramatic Extracts aids scholars in finding selections from plays copied into manuscripts. While contemporary readers often overlook lesser-known historical plays and playwrights, early modern readers did not make the same distinction.

Coverage
DEx catalogues extracts from plays written and published before the closure of theaters in 1642 and copied into manuscript before ca. 1700.

DEx is not, of course, comprehensive, as there are always new extracts being discovered (submit yours here). You can find a list of manuscripts indexed on our browse page or on our bibliography. Additional information about each manuscript is available in the bibliography.

DEx does not transcribe entire manuscripts: only those parts of a manuscript that are extracts from plays.


Towards an Integrated Digital Environment for Early Modern Studies

This website is the revised report (2020) by the Renaissance Knowledge Network group, with substantial bibliographies, arising from extensive consultations funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation from 2014 to 2016.

The report brings together the results of the 2014-2016 deliberations of the Renaissance Knowledge Network (ReKN) research group, which engages and explores how best to augment digital scholarship in early modern studies through an integrative and amalgamative approach. The second section of the report is devoted to field directories and an annotated bibliography, with abstracts and project descriptions where possible.

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Field Directories, Annotated Bibliography, and Other Resources
The listings in the second section of the report represent the combined efforts of numerous individuals up to 2017. Where convenient, they draw on existing annotations, project descriptions, and abstracts consolidated often from the referred items themselves; abstracts and project descriptions are not available in all cases. 

Directory of Content Area Resources

  • Archives
  • Editions
  • Databases
  • Catalogues
  • Geographical/Maps

Directory of Methodological Area Resources

  • Visualisation
  • Concordancing & Collation
  • General Resources
  • Network Analysis
  • Textual Analysis

Directory Publishing & Markup Resources

  • XML Conversion and Publishing
  • XML-TEI
  • Web Publishing and Platforms

Directory of Academic Publications in Early Modern Studies and Digital Humanities

  • Early Modern Studies Periodicals
  • Digital Humanities Periodicals
  • Major Editions (Early Modern Studies)
  • Major Series (Early Modern Studies)
  • Major Editions (Digital Humanities)
  • Major Series (Digital Humanities)
  • Non-traditional Publications (Digital Humanities)

Directory of Relevant Scholarly Organisations, Conferences, and Publications

  • Scholarly Societies
  • Libraries and Archives
  • Conferences and Workshops
  • Renaissance/Early Modern Studies Institutes
  • Major Initiatives

Bibliography of Relevant Academic Work

  • Digital Resource Aggregation
  • Digital Scholarly Communication
  • Digital Scholarly Editions and Archives
  • Existing Early Modern Studies Projects
  • Humanities Visualisation
  • Text Analysis

French Renaissance Paleography

The handwriting of earlier times is often very beautiful, but sometimes difficult to read. This paleography website presents French manuscripts written between 1300 and 1700, with tools for deciphering them and learning about their social, cultural, and institutional settings. The site provides integrated access to an archive of historically significant, visually captivating manuscripts held by the Newberry Library and other North American repositories. It is intended for many types of users: scholars preparing to undertake research in French-language archives; students studying French history and culture; curators and archivists who work with manuscripts; calligraphers and graphic designers interested in historical scripts and decorative practices; and anyone who would like to experiment with transcribing early French documents.

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Manuscripts and Resources
Via interactive maps, faceted browsing, and keyword searches, users can explore more than 100 manuscript documents written between 1300 and 1700, page through a dozen historical calligraphy books, and view a half-dozen historical maps. Reference materials include dictionaries, glossaries, abbreviation guides, information about French scripts and hands, an introduction to manuscript preservation, and other resources.

T-PEN(NL)
Users can practice transcribing the manuscript documents using a customized version of the T-PEN transcription tool. Transcription keys are provided for some sections of the manuscripts leaving other sections available for individual practice and collaborative work. With the group work function, students can share practice transcriptions with each other, and teachers can assign manuscripts to individual students or groups of students.

Funding
This project was supported by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Project Partners
The Newberry Library
University of Toronto Libraries
The Center for Digital Humanities at Saint Louis University
Iter

Contributing Institutions
The Newberry Library
Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Library
DePaul University Special Collections and Archives
Folger Shakespeare Library
Houghton Library, Harvard University
The Huntington Library
The J. Paul Getty Museum
The Morgan Library and Museum
Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library
Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto


Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons

Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons (GEMMS) is an open-access, group-sourced, comprehensive, fully searchable, online bibliographic database of early modern sermon manuscripts from the British Isles and North America.

GEMMS endeavours to make manuscript sermons more accessible for a wide variety of researchers, to encourage research on manuscript sermons and to provide a forum for the development of an online community of sermon scholars.

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Based at the University of Regina and the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, GEMMS is funded by SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada).

Scope
The database includes information on almost 700 manuscripts and more than 10,000 individual sermons, housed in repositories in England, Wales, Scotland, and the United States. The manuscripts range from beautiful fair copies of complete sermons to notebooks containing hastily scrawled notes by auditors. (April 2018)

Release Date
April 21, 2018

Updates
Monthly


Romeo and Juliet: Searchable Database for Prompt Books

This site includes two fully-searchable databases containing information from approximately 170 prompt-books for productions of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Data was assembled by Jill Levenson during the preparation of her Oxford Shakespeare edition of the play.

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Coverage:
Productions range from the seventeenth century to the 1980s.

Record Count
382


The Electronic Capito Project

The Electronic Capito Project provides access to the text of letters from and to Wolfgang Faber Capito (c. 1478-1541) which are either unpublished or were published before 1850 and are therefore difficult to access.

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Coverage:
Full text letters, either unpublished or published before 1850.

Alternative Formats:
The website is part of a larger editorial and translation project aimed at making the correspondence of Capito available to an English readership in conventional print form. Three print volumes have been published:

The Correspondence of Wolfgang Capito. Volume 1: 1507-1523. Edited and translated by Erica Rummel, with the assistance of Milton Kooistra. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2005. ISBN-10: 0802090176; ISBN-13: 9780802090171.

The Correspondence of Wolfgang Capito. Volume 2: 1524-1531. Edited and translated by Erica Rummel, with the assistance of Milton Kooistra. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 0802099556; ISBN-13: 9780802099556.

The Correspondence of Wolfgang Capito. Volume 3: 1532-1536. Translated by Erika Rummel. Annotated by Milton Kooistra. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2015. ISBN: 9781442637214.

Work on a fourth volume is underway.

Note:
The information on this page is based on information available on the project web site on March 31, 2018.